2 December 2021
Moscow, 57 pavilion VDNH

About the Congress

The Second Eurasian Congress will take place in Moscow on 2 December 2021. The Congress has established itself as an influential forum for open dialogue between governments and businesses in Eurasia. This year, delegates will discuss how businesses and public-private partnerships can play a greater role in unlocking the potential of Eurasian integration by enhancing production and technical cooperation, sharing advanced technologies, and building new value chains.

Program

All halls
Venue: Main Hall
Venue: Room 1
Venue: Room 2
09:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
Venue: Room 1
West–East and North–South Transport Corridors: Development, Export, Integration
Session abstracts

Transport corridors in the EAEU still fail to meet the needs of today’s travellers or reach global standards. On the Trans-Siberian Railway, for example, freight trains travel at an average of around 40 kmph and the fastest passenger train at around 65 kmph.

It is possible to unlock the EAEU transport potential with projects comparable in scale to the North–South and Europe–Western China corridors. These would generate significant additional demand and a multiplier effect along the entire value chain and cut delivery times between Western Europe and China by about 3.5 times.

In addition to the limited capacity of physical infrastructure, the low level of digitalisation in transport and document management also affects the speed of movement of goods in the EAEU. Digitalisation of the transport sector could improve its efficiency by 35%.

Issues for discussion
  • How could transport corridor projects be made attractive to all?
  • How can logistics operators operate seamlessly across different regulatory environments and jurisdictions?
  • What does a digital transport corridor look like?
  • How can the shift be made from paper-based transport and logistics to digital systems?
  • Examples and trends in the introduction of electronic consignment documents: challenges for logistics and transport companies.
  • The role of the EDB as a development institution in supporting the establishment of a single trusted interface in the movement of goods, information and payments.
Speakers
09:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
Venue: Room 2
EAEU+ Single Commodity Distribution System (SCDS): a Guarantee of Food Security in the Region and a Catalyst for Exports
Session abstracts

Whereas the 2020 pandemic affected many sectors of the global economy, agriculture was the only sector to show positive growth, with agricultural production in the EAEU rising by 2.3% in 2020.

Trade in food products reached US $7.5 billion in the EAEU, and their share of mutual trade grew from 12.3% to 13.9% over the year.

In the World Bank’s Logistics Performance Index (LPI), the EAEU countries, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are among the below average countries. Currently, the EAEU, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan have no coordinated mechanism for the transit of goods and services. The food transport and logistics system in the EAEU member states faces quantitative and qualitative constraints. The availability of storage facilities for horticultural products is low (about 40% in Russia and about 25% in Kazakhstan).

A single commodity distribution system for food products in the EAEU countries, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan would have significant economic impact as it would help to substitute imports from third countries, ensure food security in the region, increase mutual trade, and improve the efficiency of the entire food supply chain.

Issues for discussion
  • How can EAEU countries, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan participate competitively in such a system? How can participants compete on value rather than price? Will there be a level playing field for all market players, regardless of their size?
  • What are the regulatory particularities of individual countries that need to be harmonised?
  • Are national commodity distribution systems feasible and will they fit into the SCDS?
  • Where are the bottlenecks in member countries’ supply chains? How can they be eased effectively?
  • What public-private partnership schemes could be used to address these challenges?
  • How would each EDB member country benefit from the SCDS?
  • Is there enough incentive for private capital to invest in the SCDS, and if not, what needs to be done?
  • What opportunities and effects will the digitalisation and public availability of SCDS data produce for the development of a common market?
Speakers
11:00 a.m.
01:30 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Welcome speeches. Key Investment Projects: Systemic Drivers of Economic Growth in the EAEU (plenary session)
Session abstracts

The EAEU has entered a new and strategically important period of its existence, which demands new approaches and a great deal of procedural work. Unlocking the potential of integration must be pursued at pace and responses to current acute global challenges coordinated. Industrial and technological cooperation is particularly important, as is business integration, including the development of new value chains, an increase in mutual trade and investment, and the exploitation of opportunities presented by the economic proximity of the EU and China. This will ensure efficient exchange of advanced technologies and allow smaller economies to boost productivity.

The EAEU has enormous untapped potential for large-scale infrastructure projects with an integration effect in transport and logistics, the water and energy complex, and the development of a network of food hubs and digital infrastructure. Digitalisation of the EAEU economies, including the introduction of advanced digital technologies in industry, infrastructure, agribusiness, and transport, play a special role in enhancing integration. The pandemic has also necessitated the digital transformation of health services.

Non-tariff barriers within the EAEU common market is an ongoing issue. Eliminating barriers and constraints to the fullest extent possible could strengthen integrative cooperation and improve the efficiency of the customs union. Economic integration is successful when it benefits all its participants, businesses, and people.

Issues for discussion
  • Which projects are a priority?
  • What is the potential for economic integration in Eurasia?
  • What are the most significant barriers to Eurasian integration today?
  • Which economic policy approaches are a priority in realising the potential of economic integration as fully as possible?
  • What challenges need to be addressed in the regulation of Eurasian integration?
  • How might businesses and citizens be more effectively involved in integration?
  • How could the EAEU become a leader in the global competitive environment and in which sectors?
  • What role should development institutions play in deepening Eurasian integration?
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Global ESG Agenda: Common Challenges and Opportunities for the EAEU Countries
Session abstracts

The world is on the cusp of a global technological redesign, driven by the ESG agenda and reductions in CO2 emissions. A new industrial supercycle is emerging; the energy transition will lead to the overhaul of whole industries and the widespread rejection of energy-intensive technologies.

These changes bring challenges and opportunities. Economic restructuring and investment in technological upgrades to combat climate change will cost nations tens of trillions of dollars. Carbon taxes and technological overhaul could significantly reduce the competitiveness of EAEU exporters. This raises the question of how to help exporters to mitigate the impact of the cross-border carbon tax.

ESG funding is a way to minimise the costs of carbon transition financing in the EAEU countries. The world is actively developing a system to support ESG project funding from specialised funds and development banks.

The development of regional CO2 trading exchanges and cross-border carbon regulations (primarily in the EU) could stimulate such an energy transition.

The EDB is ready to act as a think tank and resource hub for ESG financing in the EAEU, including green and social loans, bonds, and finance, ESG repo transactions, derivative instruments, and swaps.

Issues for discussion
  • Where are the EAEU+ countries now in this transition? What are the constraints and what should be done to remove them and open up opportunities for market participants?
  • Which path should the EAEU follow – create a new green market or join established markets?
  • What are international financial institutions’ requirements for ESG projects in EAEU+ countries?
  • The role of development institutions in building mechanisms to synchronise regional/national greenhouse gas emission monitoring, reporting and verification systems with international CO2 trading systems (such as the EU Emissions Trading System).
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 1
Digital Eurasia: Infrastructure, Big Data, Sovereignty
Session abstracts

Digitalisation is extending across Eurasia, where regional and national digital programmes are being actively pursued. The digital agendas of individual countries and regional groupings are competing to gain comparative advantage and to a degree are converging to mutually minimise costs and avoid the emergence of additional barriers.

Key to competition and convergence are the creation of digital infrastructure and the launch of digital transformation projects and data management, which enable countries and their joint institutions to transition to a new technological paradigm. The struggle for access to infrastructures and data is a crucial element of digitalisation policies and practices at national, regional and corporate levels.

For governments, critical digital infrastructures, data management institutions and architectures are the tools which enable digital transformation and the synchronisation of transformation projects across industries and regions. They are also crucial elements of national sovereignty, which faces unprecedented challenges in the transition to a new technological paradigm.

In financial services, one of the main trends in 2021 was the launch of the central banks’ digital currencies and the piloting of relevant international settlement platforms. Using digital assets to transform economic sectors and social life is the new agenda.

Issues for discussion
  • What kind of digital infrastructure and what conditions are needed to set up national digital assets and ensure their success?
  • Is a harmonised approach possible in adopting a digital currency in the EAEU?
  • What steps need to be taken to facilitate payments in digital currencies in EAEU countries?
  • How can barrier-free interaction be ensured in data transfer and digital services?
  • What challenges must be addressed in developing critical cross-border infrastructure for the digital economy?
  • Do cross-border digital projects need special regulation?
  • How can digital integration be balanced with digital sovereignty?
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 2
Cooperation of Young Entrepreneurs in Eurasia: Barriers and Development Prospects
Session abstracts

A notable characteristic of today’s economy is the increasing role of the younger generation in reinforcing and accelerating economic transformation and in shaping established social and socio-economic trends.

The most striking examples of this is the success of the major digital multinationals which are now the flagships of the transition to a new technological paradigm. The majority of these (Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon) have been created by young enthusiasts who have, at the same time, demonstrated remarkable business acumen.

All this indicates that in today’s rapidly changing world, creating an enabling environment for young professionals, especially entrepreneurs, to grow and develop as quickly as possible, is critical to ensuring the competitiveness and potential leadership of an economic system in global markets. The Eurasian integration space is no exception.

Issues for discussion
  • Which sectors are the most interesting to the young entrepreneur today? How do the ESG criteria influence the choice of business development area?
  • >A question of scale: which type of business is more attractive to young people in our integration circuit – a small family business or the aspiration to set up a Eurasian transnational giant?
  • How could young entrepreneurial communities be built effectively and young business leaders identified? What are the barriers and opportunities for this in Eurasia?
  • How could integration institutions help young businesses to become competitive in Eurasia and globally? What type of support should be offered?
Speakers
04:30 p.m.
06:00 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Efficient Water and Energy Use as the Basis for Prosperity in Central Asia
Session abstracts

The Eurasian Development Bank estimates that the inefficient use of water and energy resources in Central Asia leads to annual losses and unrealised economic benefits amounting to as much as 1.5% of regional GDP, of which 40% of losses occur in the water sector and 60% in the electricity sector. The medium-term potential for efficiency gains in the Central Asian water-energy complex is estimated at tens of billions of dollars.

Adverse trends in climate change demand that environmental risks in the region are addressed. Managing these risks, especially in the water sector, will improve the quality of life of tens of millions of people.

Unleashing the potential for joint operation of Central Asian energy systems together with the introduction of drip irrigation in crop production, as well as the comprehensive upgrade of irrigation systems, could help solve the issue of water scarcity in the region.

Setting up a common management system for Central Asia’s water and energy complex will have synergistic economic and environmental effects in the region.

Issues for discussion
  • What mechanisms need to be in place to attract investment into upgrading Central Asia’s water management system?
  • How much state support is needed and which sources might provide support to upgrade the water management system?
  • What is required to establish a common management system for Central Asia’s water and energy complex?
  • How can the joint operation of the region’s power systems be optimised?
  • Who should take the first step?
Speakers
04:30 p.m.
06:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 1
Harmonised Socio-Economic Development of the EAEU+ Countries
Session abstracts

Despite the relatively rapid growth in the economies of Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan and their apparent progress in poverty reduction over the past decade, their lagging behind Kazakhstan, Russia, and Belarus in terms of per capita income remains significant. In 2020, for example, Armenia’s GDP per capita at PPP approximated 48% of Russia’s indicator, Uzbekistan’s 28%, Kyrgyzstan’s 18%, and Tajikistan’s 13%. 

In the meantime, another objective and determinant of integration is the convergence of socioeconomic development rates of the countries in an economic grouping. Successful convergence is also a very important factor in boosting the competitiveness of the region and individual countries on global markets.

Today, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan are facing serious challenges, including:

  • The need to boost human capital development
  • The need to create a favourable environment to develop the private sector
  • Poor physical and social infrastructure development
  • An underdeveloped financial sector
  • The high share of the informal sector

The EDB and EFSD plan to invest about US $1.2 billion in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan over the next five years. Keeping in mind the areas of support extended by other donors in line with the existing strategies, it is important to identify a mix of policies, instruments, and projects to support the convergence of EAEU+ economies.


Issues for discussion
  • Roles of key investors and donors in supporting the EAEU+ region’s development agenda.
  • International development institutions’ areas of work to ensure economic and financial stability
  • International development banks and donor countries’ resources available for the development of the education sector
  • The importance of building the capacity of the countries’ financial sector
  • What is the role of international development institutions in building capacity and improving conditions for private sector development?
Speakers
11:00 a.m.
01:30 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Welcome speeches. Key Investment Projects: Systemic Drivers of Economic Growth in the EAEU (plenary session)
Session abstracts

The EAEU has entered a new and strategically important period of its existence, which demands new approaches and a great deal of procedural work. Unlocking the potential of integration must be pursued at pace and responses to current acute global challenges coordinated. Industrial and technological cooperation is particularly important, as is business integration, including the development of new value chains, an increase in mutual trade and investment, and the exploitation of opportunities presented by the economic proximity of the EU and China. This will ensure efficient exchange of advanced technologies and allow smaller economies to boost productivity.

The EAEU has enormous untapped potential for large-scale infrastructure projects with an integration effect in transport and logistics, the water and energy complex, and the development of a network of food hubs and digital infrastructure. Digitalisation of the EAEU economies, including the introduction of advanced digital technologies in industry, infrastructure, agribusiness, and transport, play a special role in enhancing integration. The pandemic has also necessitated the digital transformation of health services.

Non-tariff barriers within the EAEU common market is an ongoing issue. Eliminating barriers and constraints to the fullest extent possible could strengthen integrative cooperation and improve the efficiency of the customs union. Economic integration is successful when it benefits all its participants, businesses, and people.

Issues for discussion
  • Which projects are a priority?
  • What is the potential for economic integration in Eurasia?
  • What are the most significant barriers to Eurasian integration today?
  • Which economic policy approaches are a priority in realising the potential of economic integration as fully as possible?
  • What challenges need to be addressed in the regulation of Eurasian integration?
  • How might businesses and citizens be more effectively involved in integration?
  • How could the EAEU become a leader in the global competitive environment and in which sectors?
  • What role should development institutions play in deepening Eurasian integration?
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Global ESG Agenda: Common Challenges and Opportunities for the EAEU Countries
Session abstracts

The world is on the cusp of a global technological redesign, driven by the ESG agenda and reductions in CO2 emissions. A new industrial supercycle is emerging; the energy transition will lead to the overhaul of whole industries and the widespread rejection of energy-intensive technologies.

These changes bring challenges and opportunities. Economic restructuring and investment in technological upgrades to combat climate change will cost nations tens of trillions of dollars. Carbon taxes and technological overhaul could significantly reduce the competitiveness of EAEU exporters. This raises the question of how to help exporters to mitigate the impact of the cross-border carbon tax.

ESG funding is a way to minimise the costs of carbon transition financing in the EAEU countries. The world is actively developing a system to support ESG project funding from specialised funds and development banks.

The development of regional CO2 trading exchanges and cross-border carbon regulations (primarily in the EU) could stimulate such an energy transition.

The EDB is ready to act as a think tank and resource hub for ESG financing in the EAEU, including green and social loans, bonds, and finance, ESG repo transactions, derivative instruments, and swaps.

Issues for discussion
  • Where are the EAEU+ countries now in this transition? What are the constraints and what should be done to remove them and open up opportunities for market participants?
  • Which path should the EAEU follow – create a new green market or join established markets?
  • What are international financial institutions’ requirements for ESG projects in EAEU+ countries?
  • The role of development institutions in building mechanisms to synchronise regional/national greenhouse gas emission monitoring, reporting and verification systems with international CO2 trading systems (such as the EU Emissions Trading System).
Speakers
04:30 p.m.
06:00 p.m.
Venue: Main Hall
Efficient Water and Energy Use as the Basis for Prosperity in Central Asia
Session abstracts

The Eurasian Development Bank estimates that the inefficient use of water and energy resources in Central Asia leads to annual losses and unrealised economic benefits amounting to as much as 1.5% of regional GDP, of which 40% of losses occur in the water sector and 60% in the electricity sector. The medium-term potential for efficiency gains in the Central Asian water-energy complex is estimated at tens of billions of dollars.

Adverse trends in climate change demand that environmental risks in the region are addressed. Managing these risks, especially in the water sector, will improve the quality of life of tens of millions of people.

Unleashing the potential for joint operation of Central Asian energy systems together with the introduction of drip irrigation in crop production, as well as the comprehensive upgrade of irrigation systems, could help solve the issue of water scarcity in the region.

Setting up a common management system for Central Asia’s water and energy complex will have synergistic economic and environmental effects in the region.

Issues for discussion
  • What mechanisms need to be in place to attract investment into upgrading Central Asia’s water management system?
  • How much state support is needed and which sources might provide support to upgrade the water management system?
  • What is required to establish a common management system for Central Asia’s water and energy complex?
  • How can the joint operation of the region’s power systems be optimised?
  • Who should take the first step?
Speakers
09:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
Venue: Room 1
West–East and North–South Transport Corridors: Development, Export, Integration
Session abstracts

Transport corridors in the EAEU still fail to meet the needs of today’s travellers or reach global standards. On the Trans-Siberian Railway, for example, freight trains travel at an average of around 40 kmph and the fastest passenger train at around 65 kmph.

It is possible to unlock the EAEU transport potential with projects comparable in scale to the North–South and Europe–Western China corridors. These would generate significant additional demand and a multiplier effect along the entire value chain and cut delivery times between Western Europe and China by about 3.5 times.

In addition to the limited capacity of physical infrastructure, the low level of digitalisation in transport and document management also affects the speed of movement of goods in the EAEU. Digitalisation of the transport sector could improve its efficiency by 35%.

Issues for discussion
  • How could transport corridor projects be made attractive to all?
  • How can logistics operators operate seamlessly across different regulatory environments and jurisdictions?
  • What does a digital transport corridor look like?
  • How can the shift be made from paper-based transport and logistics to digital systems?
  • Examples and trends in the introduction of electronic consignment documents: challenges for logistics and transport companies.
  • The role of the EDB as a development institution in supporting the establishment of a single trusted interface in the movement of goods, information and payments.
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 1
Digital Eurasia: Infrastructure, Big Data, Sovereignty
Session abstracts

Digitalisation is extending across Eurasia, where regional and national digital programmes are being actively pursued. The digital agendas of individual countries and regional groupings are competing to gain comparative advantage and to a degree are converging to mutually minimise costs and avoid the emergence of additional barriers.

Key to competition and convergence are the creation of digital infrastructure and the launch of digital transformation projects and data management, which enable countries and their joint institutions to transition to a new technological paradigm. The struggle for access to infrastructures and data is a crucial element of digitalisation policies and practices at national, regional and corporate levels.

For governments, critical digital infrastructures, data management institutions and architectures are the tools which enable digital transformation and the synchronisation of transformation projects across industries and regions. They are also crucial elements of national sovereignty, which faces unprecedented challenges in the transition to a new technological paradigm.

In financial services, one of the main trends in 2021 was the launch of the central banks’ digital currencies and the piloting of relevant international settlement platforms. Using digital assets to transform economic sectors and social life is the new agenda.

Issues for discussion
  • What kind of digital infrastructure and what conditions are needed to set up national digital assets and ensure their success?
  • Is a harmonised approach possible in adopting a digital currency in the EAEU?
  • What steps need to be taken to facilitate payments in digital currencies in EAEU countries?
  • How can barrier-free interaction be ensured in data transfer and digital services?
  • What challenges must be addressed in developing critical cross-border infrastructure for the digital economy?
  • Do cross-border digital projects need special regulation?
  • How can digital integration be balanced with digital sovereignty?
Speakers
04:30 p.m.
06:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 1
Harmonised Socio-Economic Development of the EAEU+ Countries
Session abstracts

Despite the relatively rapid growth in the economies of Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan and their apparent progress in poverty reduction over the past decade, their lagging behind Kazakhstan, Russia, and Belarus in terms of per capita income remains significant. In 2020, for example, Armenia’s GDP per capita at PPP approximated 48% of Russia’s indicator, Uzbekistan’s 28%, Kyrgyzstan’s 18%, and Tajikistan’s 13%. 

In the meantime, another objective and determinant of integration is the convergence of socioeconomic development rates of the countries in an economic grouping. Successful convergence is also a very important factor in boosting the competitiveness of the region and individual countries on global markets.

Today, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan are facing serious challenges, including:

  • The need to boost human capital development
  • The need to create a favourable environment to develop the private sector
  • Poor physical and social infrastructure development
  • An underdeveloped financial sector
  • The high share of the informal sector

The EDB and EFSD plan to invest about US $1.2 billion in Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan over the next five years. Keeping in mind the areas of support extended by other donors in line with the existing strategies, it is important to identify a mix of policies, instruments, and projects to support the convergence of EAEU+ economies.


Issues for discussion
  • Roles of key investors and donors in supporting the EAEU+ region’s development agenda.
  • International development institutions’ areas of work to ensure economic and financial stability
  • International development banks and donor countries’ resources available for the development of the education sector
  • The importance of building the capacity of the countries’ financial sector
  • What is the role of international development institutions in building capacity and improving conditions for private sector development?
Speakers
09:00 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
Venue: Room 2
EAEU+ Single Commodity Distribution System (SCDS): a Guarantee of Food Security in the Region and a Catalyst for Exports
Session abstracts

Whereas the 2020 pandemic affected many sectors of the global economy, agriculture was the only sector to show positive growth, with agricultural production in the EAEU rising by 2.3% in 2020.

Trade in food products reached US $7.5 billion in the EAEU, and their share of mutual trade grew from 12.3% to 13.9% over the year.

In the World Bank’s Logistics Performance Index (LPI), the EAEU countries, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are among the below average countries. Currently, the EAEU, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan have no coordinated mechanism for the transit of goods and services. The food transport and logistics system in the EAEU member states faces quantitative and qualitative constraints. The availability of storage facilities for horticultural products is low (about 40% in Russia and about 25% in Kazakhstan).

A single commodity distribution system for food products in the EAEU countries, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan would have significant economic impact as it would help to substitute imports from third countries, ensure food security in the region, increase mutual trade, and improve the efficiency of the entire food supply chain.

Issues for discussion
  • How can EAEU countries, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan participate competitively in such a system? How can participants compete on value rather than price? Will there be a level playing field for all market players, regardless of their size?
  • What are the regulatory particularities of individual countries that need to be harmonised?
  • Are national commodity distribution systems feasible and will they fit into the SCDS?
  • Where are the bottlenecks in member countries’ supply chains? How can they be eased effectively?
  • What public-private partnership schemes could be used to address these challenges?
  • How would each EDB member country benefit from the SCDS?
  • Is there enough incentive for private capital to invest in the SCDS, and if not, what needs to be done?
  • What opportunities and effects will the digitalisation and public availability of SCDS data produce for the development of a common market?
Speakers
02:30 p.m.
04:00 p.m.
Venue: Room 2
Cooperation of Young Entrepreneurs in Eurasia: Barriers and Development Prospects
Session abstracts

A notable characteristic of today’s economy is the increasing role of the younger generation in reinforcing and accelerating economic transformation and in shaping established social and socio-economic trends.

The most striking examples of this is the success of the major digital multinationals which are now the flagships of the transition to a new technological paradigm. The majority of these (Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon) have been created by young enthusiasts who have, at the same time, demonstrated remarkable business acumen.

All this indicates that in today’s rapidly changing world, creating an enabling environment for young professionals, especially entrepreneurs, to grow and develop as quickly as possible, is critical to ensuring the competitiveness and potential leadership of an economic system in global markets. The Eurasian integration space is no exception.

Issues for discussion
  • Which sectors are the most interesting to the young entrepreneur today? How do the ESG criteria influence the choice of business development area?
  • >A question of scale: which type of business is more attractive to young people in our integration circuit – a small family business or the aspiration to set up a Eurasian transnational giant?
  • How could young entrepreneurial communities be built effectively and young business leaders identified? What are the barriers and opportunities for this in Eurasia?
  • How could integration institutions help young businesses to become competitive in Eurasia and globally? What type of support should be offered?
Speakers

General media partner

Digital partners